About the Author

Michelle Reyes, Ph.D., is an Indian American pastor’s wife, writer, and activist. She is also the Vice President of the Asian American Christian Collaborative and writes regularly on faith, culture, and justice. Michelle lives in Austin, TX with her husband and two kids. Follow her on IG @michelleamireyes.

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  1. Michelle,

    You hit the nail on the head with this great post. This country is so divisive & filled with hatred. Everyone is screaming out their ideas & not wanting to hear or work with others. Christ called us to be bold & go make disciples of everyone. It seems lately that no one wants to hear the “good news”. 2 Timothy 4:3 For the time will come when people will not put up with sound doctrine. Instead, to suit their own desires, they will gather around them a great number of teachers to say what their itching ears want to hear. We need to get bold & start declaring the truth because only the truth will set men free. We should do so in loving ways. We need a unity revolution. This country needs more unity & love. Everyone should walk a mile in others shoes & get a taste of someone else’s life & trials. God will bless you both for working towards unity & love in Austin!

    Blessings 🙂

    • Beth – I LOVE your description of “a unity revolution”! Yes, and amen! Our words will be heard so much more when they are peppered with grace, humility and understanding. We do, indeed, need to walk a mile in another person’s shoes and understand their life before “jumping in” to any conversation, really. That is a very practical way of marrying boldness and love. Thanks for sharing this.

  2. What a crushing experience to be silenced by a “friend” in such a dismissive way. I’m so sorry this was part of your story. Late last year, I read Kathy Khang’s book (Raise Your Voice), and it was a similar experience that lit a flame in her own heart to use the voice God has given her to speak Truth, and to champion those who are not being heard.
    Your stories challenge me to keep my eyes and my ears open and to be more thoughtful about all the voices in the room.

    • Michelle,
      I will also try to keep my eyes and ears more open. I would like to join you Michelle, and say how sorry I am to you Michele for your hurtful experience.
      This morning by your courage to take action, goodness flowed. Thank-you for sharing.
      I hope that you all have a blessed day,
      Penny

      • Thank you, Penny, for your encouraging words and your support! I’m grateful that my story has spoken a word to you. We truly are a sisterhood, joining in arms, to boldly love and speak the truth together. I love that.

    • Hey there, Michele! I actually just finished reading Khang’s book a few weeks ago, and I so resonated with her experiences. Her passion, her boldness, her experiences of being silenced. Oh, it’s painful, and confusing, especially when the silencing comes from friends. Great book. I keep looking to the model of Christ, the rejection he experienced and his response: “Forgive them, Father, for they know not what they do.” I’ve come to be more and more selective as to when I share my voice, but, when the criticism comes, I’ve also learned to love, forgive and keep striving for unity.

  3. Thank you Michelle for having the courage to speak up.
    And yes, we should work to be united as a world for Jesus as you and your husband have done by your faithfulness in ministery.
    We need more multicultural churches today in America.
    I love my suburban church and pray regularly that we attract more people from different culture.
    Love and blessings,
    Maggie

    • Maggie, I love your heart and your prayer. Pursuing a multicultural church (as well as multicultural communities and friendships) is messy and hard, but it is a mess worth making!

  4. Great insight! What would our world be like if we said, “I will put away all bitterness and anger and wrath and shouting and slander, along with all malice. And I will be kind and compassionate to others, forgiving them just as God in Christ also forgave me” (Ephesians 4:31–32)

  5. “The aim of boldness is unity, not division. The aim of courage is love and reconciliation, not new hostilities.” YES!

    Friend, I’m so sorry for your experience in that Sunday School class, but I’m so grateful for your willingness to share it here and allow it to be a teachable moment for us all. I too want to be the kind of woman who gets fired up for the sake of Christ and is willing to speak with both boldness and grace no matter the cost.